McCormick-Deering Model 33A Tractor-Mounted Power Loader

McCormick-Deering Model 33A

Tractor-Mounted Power Loader

by

Brian Wayne Wells

  This article remains under construction.  Periodically, new blocks of text will appear in the article and/or  current blocks of text will be corrected.

The Farmall Model 300 which bears the Serial Number 22368 is the subject of another article in this website called “The Farmall Model 300 Tractor.” As noted at the end of that article No. 22368 when the tractor was sold to Wells Family Tractors in the Spring of 2018, the tractor was sold to with the a McCormick-Deering Model 33A power loader mounted on the tractor. This Model 33A loader is the subject of the present article.

As noted, in another article on this website called “The 1955 Farmall Model 300 Tractor bearing the Serial Number 22368,” when this Model 300 tractor was sold to Wells Family Tractors Inc. in the spring of 2018, No. 22368  was fitted with a mounted McCormick-Deering Model 33A tractor loader.  This loader probably was not mounted on the tractor at the time of its initial purchase in 1955 from the International Harvester Company dealership in Chaska, Minnesota.  Rather, the loader must have been purchased and mounted on the No. 22368 at a later date.  The loader mounted on No. 22368 is identified by decals on the lifting arms as a Model 33A loader. 

The original factory installed decals on the McCormick-Deering Model 33A loader mounted on No. 22368.

Some time prior to the introduction of the Model 33A power loader, the International Harvester Company had manufactured an earlier power tractor loader called the Model 33 tractor-mounted power loader.  The hydraulic controlled tractor mounted power loader had really only come into its own in the period of time since the Second World War. technological Farm equipment manufacturers were just leaning about the However, the Model 33 was not successful in field operations because it was an extremely light loader–too light for most of the jobs that farmers found for the loader on their farms.

and was not a successful power loader looked nothing like the loader shown on the cover of the the piece of advertising literature shown below.  The loader pictured on the cover is much improved over the Model 33.  Indeed it is an exact duplicate of the heavier, more rugged  Model 33A loader.  The fact that the loader is mounted on a Farmall Model 350 wide-front tractor, suggests that the Model 33A loader must have replaced the Model 33 at a time concurrent with introduction of the Farmall Model 350 and Model 450 tractors.

The advertising booklet pictured above purports to feature the “Model 33” loader. However, the loader pictured is actually a Model 33A which was introduced to replace the much lighter Model 33 loader.  The Model 33 looked much different than the 33A.  Rather than being a piece of literature advertising the Model 33, it seems that this is a piece of literature is introducing the Model 33A loader to the farming public.  It just seems that McCormick-Deering was intending on introducing the new loader pictured here as a “new improved” Model 33 loader and only later decided to designate the new  model loader as the Model 33A  to avoid confusion because of the great number changes between the Model 33 and the Model 33A.  This piece of literature supports the thought that the Model 33A loader was introduced during the short production run of the 350 and 450 tractors from the late fall of 1956 until the late summer of 1958.   

 

In addition to being independent hydraulic cylinders on either side of the Model 33A loader controlled by the inside lever of the three hydraulic control levers on the right side of the dash board on the operator’s platform.  The hydraulic cylinders were also “two-way” cylinders.  This means that the cylinders on the arms of the loader can apply pressure and power in both directions–when contracting as well as when extending.  Lifting the loader is effected by pulling back on the “inside” hydraulic ed, above, when purchased in the spring of 2018, No. 22368  was fitted with a mounted McCormick-Deering Model 33A tractor loader.  This loader probably was not mounted on the tractor at the time of its initial purchase in 1955 from the International Harvester Company dealership in Chaska, Minnesota.  Rather, the loader must have been was mounted on the No. 22368 at a later date.  The loader mounted on No. 22368 is identified by decals on the lifting arms as a Model 33A loader. 

 

 

 

There was a Model 33 tractor-mounted power loader.  However, the Model 33 was an extremely light loader and looked nothing like the loader shown on the cover of the the piece of advertising literature shown below.  The loader pictured on the cover is much improved over the Model 33.  Indeed it is an exact duplicate of the heavier, more rugged  Model 33A loader.  The fact that the loader is mounted on a Farmall Model 350 wide-front tractor, suggests that the Model 33A loader must have replaced the Model 33 at a time concurrent with introduction of the Farmall Model 350 and Model 450 tractors.       

 

 

The advertising booklet pictured above purports to feature the “Model 33” loader. However, the loader pictured is actually a Model 33A which was introduced to replace the much lighter Model 33 loader.  The Model 33 looked much different than the 33A.  Rather than being a piece of literature advertising the Model 33, it seems that this is a piece of literature is introducing the Model 33A loader to the farming public.  It just seems that McCormick-Deering was intending on introducing the new loader pictured here as a “new improved” Model 33 loader and only later decided to designate the new  model loader as the Model 33A  to avoid confusion because of the great number changes between the Model 33 and the Model 33A.  This piece of literature supports the thought that the Model 33A loader was introduced during the short production run of the 350 and 450 tractors from the late fall of 1956 until the late summer of 1958.   

 

 

 

Once the Model 33A loader was introduced, International Harvester continued to make improvements to the loader in a never ending attempt to strengthen the loader.  One of the features of the early style Model 33A  In  particular, while the early style of Model 33A had a segmented arrangement of supports between the upper rail and the lower rail of each arm on the loader.  The loader pictured on the cover of the advertising literature shown above, has the segmented reinforcement between the upper and lower rails on the arms of the loader arms.  Clearly this is a very early version of the Model 33A power loader.  Later versions of the Model 33A had a single piece reinforcement over the whole space between the upper and lower rails of the loader arms, rather than just intermittent segments of reinforcement.  

 

 

The late style Model 33a loader featuring the single piece reinforcement of the entire space between the upper and lower beams on the arms on either side of the loader..

 

The style of Model 33A loader mounted on No. 22368 was one these later manufactured 33A loaders which featured the single piece reinforcement over the whole space between the upper and lower rails of the arms on each side of the loader.  This single piece reinforcement of the entire space between the upper and lower beams on the arms of the loader appears to be a feature that distinguishes the later 33A loaders from the earlier Model 33A loaders with the segemented style of reinforcement.  .  

 

 

The upper and lower support bars on the arms of the McCormick Deering Model 33A power loader are connected with a single piecwe of metal–indicating that this loader mounted on No. 22368 is a late styled Model 33A power. loader. .

 

The advertising picture below shows a brand new McCormick-Deering Model 201 manure spreader being loader with manure for the first time.  The manure spreader is hitched to a Model 350 Farmall tractor.  Loading the manure into the spreader is a Model 450 Farmall tractor with a early style Model 33A loader with the segmented form of reinforcement between the upper and lower rails on the arms of the loader.  This is further evidence of the  contention that the Model 33A loader was introduced during the production run of the Model 350 and Model 450 tractors, between the late autumn of 1956 and the late summer of 1958.

 

This picture of a brand new manure spreader being loaded with manure for the first time is clearly a promotional picture taken by the International Harvester Company.  The picture is important because it shows the early style Model 33A tractor loader mounted on a new Farmall Model 450 tractor. This suggests that the Model 33A tractor loader was introduced during the production run of the Model 450 and Model 350 tractors from the late autumn of 1956 through the,late summer of 1958.

Installation of the Model 33A loader on No. 22368 well after the tractor’s initial purchase in 1955, suggests that the tractor was being prepared for a career as a loader tractor.  However, neither the tractor nor the loader bear any signs of excess wear or even normal use.

No. 22368 appears to be a tractor that has hardly been used by the time the tractor was later purchased in about 2000 by David Falk of Waconia, Minnesota. When No, 22368 was sold to Brian     of  LeSueur, Minnesota.  As noted above, Wells Family Tractors, purchased No. 22368 from Wayne Schwartz in the summer of 2018 complete with its McCormick-Deering Model 33A tractor power loader.  The intent was to use No. 22368 and its mounted farm loader, as a utility tractor around the Wells Family Tractor warehouse located in LeSueur, Minnesota, for, among other tasks, loading steel-wheeled plows and other heavy steel-wheeled farm machinery on a trailer to be transported to the LeSueur Pioneer Power in rural LeSueur community.  For this type of large scale fork lift type of work a hydraulically powered loader bucket was a requirement.  However, the particular Model 33A power loader mounted on No. 22368 was fitted with a “dump-style” bucket intended for cleaning manure from a barn and dumping it into a manure spreader.

Research by Mark Wells revealed that a hydraulic cylinder,  supports and hydraulic hoses were available as part of an optional power bucket for the Model 33A farm tractor loader.  Further, research by Mark Wells on Craig’s List found that another Model 33A tractor power loader with the optional power bucket was for sale at a location on the shore of Mille Lac Lake, near the small town of Isle, Minnesota.  This loader was owned by David Steve Martin of Champlin, Minnesota (2010 pop. 23,089).  Although living in Champlin, Minnesota David had a piece of land on the shores of Mille Lacs Lake near Isle, Minnesota (2010 pop. 751).  On this property David  kept several Farmall tractors including quite a few Famall H’s.  Nearly all of these Farmalls are in running order as David proved by starting nearlt akl of them quite easily during the short amount of time that the current author was in on his property. 

To pickup the loader and bring it back to LeSueur, the current author determined that it would be most easily done by taking the 1951 Farmall H’s owned by Wells Family Tractors to David’s property in Isle and partially mounting the loader on the rear axle housings of that tractor and then backing the tractor around toward the and then pulling the tractor and loader up on to the bed-over wheels trailer with the winch on the trailor towed behind the current author’s pickup truck.

 

 

 

Accordingly, one July day in 2018, the current author hitched up the trailer to his pickup truck and loaded up the 1951 Famall H bearing the serial number 375596 onto the trailer.  The current author got off early in the morning and found David and was guided to his property by periodic conversations over the cell phone. Arriving early in the town of Isle, the author found that the cloudy weather and periodic breezes while threating rain did keep the July day rather coolish considering the month. 

 

The early style Model 33A McCormick-Deering tractor tractor loader on the ground of the property of David Steve Martin located in Isle, Minnesota on the shore of Mille Lac Lake. The hydraulic cylinder attached to the bucket of the loader can easily be seen in this picture.  Although one of the early style loaders this particular loader is, nonetheless, fitted with the optional hydraulic cylinder on the bucket.  It was this feature that attracted Mark Wells and the current author to this loader. They wished to move the bucket cylinder to the later style 33A tractor loader that they already had purchased along with No.     

   

The author was able to get the loader attached to the rear axles housings of the Farmall H bearing the serial number 375596. after pulling the  After talking with David Steve Martin over the phone the current author drove to Mille Lacing not fitted with a hydraulically powered for this ther heavy tfor  In from    ,

The Farmall Super C which bears the Serial Number

by

Brian Wayne Wells

           This article remains under construction.  Periodically, new blocks of text will appear in the article and/or  current blocks of text will be corrected.

The Super C purchased by late Ambrose Holicky is seen being driven by his son, Howard Holicky. Howard restored the Super C that was first and fitted the tractor with the same number of wheel weights that were mounted on the Super C which was tested at the University of Nebraska on and with the , e here plowing the field in the

In 1954 Ambrose Holicky had been farming since he returned home to LeSueur County from the Second World War. As noted in an earlier article in this an earlier article, in 1953 he had purchased a new 1953 Super M Farmall from the Charles Clark Implement dealership in Cleveland, Minnesota. This was Ambrose Holicky’s main tractor on the farm. (See the article included in this website called “Charles Cook Implement Dealership in Cleveland, Minnesota: The 1953 Super M purchased by Ambrose Holicky.”)

By 1959, he had two sons that were now of age to help him on the farm and as a result he needed a a second tractor. Attending auctions in the LeSueur County area, he eventually found a 1952 Super C and bid on the tractor and ended up as the owner of the tractor.